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 THE OFFICIAL SITE OF THE EUROPEAN NEW CAR ASSESSMENT PROGRAMME



 

FAQ

The testing process

Where are the crash tests performed?
What tests do Euro NCAP perform?
How were the tests arrived at?
Why not carry out a wider range of tests?
Why have you chosen such a high front impact test speed?
Should this not be higher given driving speed limits are higher?
How is the injury risk to car occupants determined from crash data?
Are the barrier tests repeatable?



Where are the crash tests performed?

Euro NCAP tests are performed at six laboratories around Europe. These include one based in France (UTAC in Montlhery), two based in Germany (ADAC in Munich and BAS in Bergisch Gladbach), one in the Netherlands (TNO in Helmond), one in Spain (IDIADA in Tarragona), one in Italy (CSI in Milano) and finally one in the UK (Thatcham).




What tests do Euro NCAP perform?

You will more details about our tests under The tests explained.




How were the tests arrived at?
The test procedures are based on those developed by the European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC) for legislation, except the front impact speed is increased by 8 km/h so as to cover accident severity leading to most deaths and serious injuries. The pole test is based on standards developed in the US. Cars designed to do well in the Euro NCAP tests should offer improved protection in a wide variety of road accidents.


Why not carry out a wider range of tests?
It is the duty of manufacturers to design and test cars to meet the full range of accidents. The Euro NCAP tests cover an important range of accidents. A well-designed car will perform well in the Euro NCAP tests, and one that does badly is less likely to provide adequate protection in a real life crash.


Why have you chosen such a high front impact test speed?
By carrying out frontal impact tests at 64km/h (about 40 mph) we are simulating a car impacting a similar sized car where both cars are travelling the same speed of 55 km/h. This speed has been shown by accident studies to address a high proportion of fatal and severe injury accidents.


Should this not be higher given driving speed limits are higher?
Accident research shows that carrying out frontal impacts at 64km/h speed covers a large proportion of the serious and fatal accidents which occur. Even if the maximum speed limit is 120 km/h, few accidents occur at such speeds and where they do, it is beyond current capabilities to provide protection for the car's occupants.


How is the injury risk to car occupants determined from crash data?

The injury risk is assessed using a number of sources including data from the dummy's instruments, examination of the high-speed film and examination of the car by vehicle inspectors. As there is no instrumentation to measure injury risk in certain areas, adjustments are also made to take account of other potential dangers, including those to different sized occupants. The Euro NCAP assessment protocol is then applied to reach the rating for each adult occupant body region.




Are the barrier tests repeatable?
Yes. The repeatability of the test procedure was fully investigated in research by the EEVC.






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